The student news site of Day Creek Intermediate School

The Day Creek Howl

The student news site of Day Creek Intermediate School

The Day Creek Howl

The student news site of Day Creek Intermediate School

The Day Creek Howl

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My Mom’s music

Two different pop-culture icons; from Michael Jackson to Taylor Swift, the times have certainly changed.
Madi C.
Two different pop-culture icons; from Michael Jackson to Taylor Swift, the times have certainly changed.

Taylor Swifts Newest Album Release: Tortured Poets Department
Enjoy Listening to it!!
Everybody will get their 15 minutes of fame. Or at least try. However, nowadays, it seems more like 15 seconds as the music industry gets increasingly more competitive. The number of ‘one-hit wonders’ seems to be increasing while the amount of time an artist or band is famous seems to only decrease. 

Throughout the years, music has undoubtedly changed. Everyone knows that. But have these changes altered music positively? 

“Music from the past is better than music from now,” said Diego B., a 7th-grader at Day Creek. 

Many teens enjoy music from a prior generation. Even those who don’t, often have their Spotify playlists influenced by the past. Students often listen to artists whose music is reminiscent of a different age- such as modern-day Laufey, who has revived the ‘40s jazz style. 

“Music from the past has a different vibe to it,” said Melissa D, a 6th grader.  “It just feels unique. It has a different sort of beat.”

Teens in this generation feel like decades-old music has a unique feel, leading to an expansion of their tastes in music. With newer songs being seemingly more redundant, students are actively searching for diversity in music, often finding it in prior decades. 

“All country songs sound the same,” said Melissa D. “It’s always about trucks.” 

Of course, the quick-lived fame of today’s idols doesn’t help. An artist’s career seems as short-lived as any generation. Aside from the Taylor Swifts of the world, everyone else seems to exit just as quickly as they entered. 

Artists from the late ‘80s to the late ‘90s have gained significant attention as teens gravitate to the originality in their songs.

“Today’s music isn’t really that popular,” Diego B. said. “Music from the past is much more original. I like Ice Cube, Snoop Dogg…” Diego B. continued. “‘90’s rap.” 

Oddly enough, this sends students into their parents’ generation of music, which has been played throughout their childhood on mom and dad’s Camry stereos and home Bose systems. Thus Madonna has wedged her way between Ice Spice and Drake on a Pandora playlist. 

Oddly enough, this sends students into their parents’ generation of music, which has been played throughout their childhood on mom and dad’s stereos, so everyone knows who Madonna is. 

“When they play it over and over,” Kate H. says, “It sticks in your head. You want to listen to it.”

Parents aren’t the only ones to blame. Now, as students pick up their phones, Tupac bursts through their headphones. 

7th grader Alexis M. says, “A lot of old songs are going viral on TikTok as audios.”

With the use of social media, teens can expand their genre of music. Little snippets of songs like “Big Weenie” by Eminem or “Head Over Heels” by Tears for Fears are some popular audios used throughout platforms like TikTok or Instagram.   

“They’re blowing up on social media,” Sixth-grader Sanaya M. stated, “People are using them as sounds to their stories and TikToks.” 

Trends on social media platforms promote music from the early 2000’s or the late 90’s. With this, it can influence how kids listen to music. 

“It’s so much easier to find music, or hear it through the videos you watch,” 7th-grade teacher Alexandra Kuramata stated, “Then, people share it, whether it’s through their stories or whatever. It’s more word of mouth.” 

No matter the origins of this shift in the music industry, it’s still obvious that the past is coming back, even in more ways than music.

“Even just the ‘90s and ‘00s style trends are coming back,” Kuramata stated, “and the music with it.”

Parents and social media aren’t the only ones to blame. In films, TV series, novels and more, numerous references have been made to older music.

Undoubtedly, older music is trending. Social media, parents, and peers all influence teens nowadays to expand the genres of music they listen to. Next time a student plays some music, try paying attention to the release date. It may surprise you.

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About the Contributors
Chloe S.
Chloe S., Opinion Writer
Chloe enjoys working with other people. She wants to pursue being a doctor in the future. Chloe has a big love for cats, especially the grey ones. She likes dogs too, of course. Chloe's mom is insanely obsessed with K-drama, so she likes watching it with her sometimes.
Plum C.
Plum C., Opinion Writer
Plum has loved to write since 2nd grade. She someday hopes to be an author and a lawyer. She enjoys reading and drawing in her free time. Plum prefers writing opinionated pieces, but also loves to write stories. The first book she wrote is called "Donut Cat."
Madi C.
Madi C., Photographer
Madi loves to travel and explore new places. Her dream is to travel the world and try new things in each place she goes to. Her dream destination is Europe and hopes one day she will get to go there.