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Top 10 Crazy Easter Traditions From Around The World

Dying eggs with food coloring is a tradition in America.

image credited to commons.wikimedia.org

Dying eggs with food coloring is a tradition in America.

Claire D., Writer

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Here in America, we celebrate Easter by gorging ourselves with candy which allegedly came from a giant magical rabbit. Thinking about our crazy traditions, how is it possible that someone somewhere has one to top us? It is possible, as you have most likely seen my other articles on crazy holiday traditions. Let’s get started!

  1. We’re starting off easy, with a tradition that hits a little close to home. Since Christians celebrate Easter for the resurrection of Jesus after his crucifixion, eggs are common symbols to represent rebirth, whether it be of Christ or a baby chick! Ukrainian folks often paint their Easter eggs with elaborate nature scenes or other geometric designs. This tradition is so famous, the design has its own name – “Pysanky.”

 

  1. Continuing the Easter egg theme, the Greeks only dye their eggs red. This is to symbolize Jesus’ blood on the cross.

 

  1. Okay, more religious ceremonies. In several countries, Easter is “celebrated” by burning a statue of Judas, the betrayer of Jesus. To add extra effects, the model is hung from a rope and sometimes has the face of an unpopular politician (*cough*, Trump, Hillary, *cough*) to add to the fun!

 

  1. Straying away from the bloody crosses and burning Trumps, here comes a much sweeter, or creamier, tradition. In Poland, it is customary to decorate your Easter basket or brunch table with a butter lamb. Don’t panic, this is simply a little lamb made out of butter. Cute perhaps, but awfully strange.

 

  1. Back with the dramatic religious reenactments comes a Filipino tradition. To understand the pain that Jesus went through, some Christians nail themselves to the cross, and even get lit on fire, although not long enough to see lasting effects. Talk about extreme!

 

  1. Moving towards a tamer subject, this English tradition takes place on Maundy Thursday, the Thursday before Easter. This day is celebrated because it is the day Jesus enjoyed his Last Supper before the crucifixion. Because this, the Queen of England shows her generosity by handing out special commemorative coins which equal the years of her age. This year, the queen handed out coins amounting to 84 pence (about 1 dollar) to certain recipients.

 

  1. A very local tradition, a historic town in Texas celebrates Easter their own way. Every Easter’s eve, the town of Fredericksburg is lit (literally) with bonfires. This is done to commemorate the peace treaty made with the Comanche Indians years ago. However, a popular story to tell to the kids is that the Easter bunny uses these fires to help dye the eggs. Another way this town celebrates Easter is by baking a lamb cake. “Another lamb thing?” you ask. Yes, but this is not a cake made of lamb, but a cake shaped like a lamb, like the butter lamb a few places back.

 

  1. Now heading to Bermuda is a tradition of kite-flying that will blow you away! Okay, that was bad. When a British schoolteacher used a kite as an analogy for Christ’s ascension into Heaven, the tradition stuck. Now, every Easter, there are always dozens of kites flying on the shores to celebrate.

 

  1. In Greek festivities, the traditional Easter mass is held, but after that, things start getting strange. For lunch, many a Greek enjoys a nice hot, steaming bowl of soup. What meat? You guessed it, lamb meat. And not only is it a lamb soup, it is a lamb stomach soup. Lamb stomach. Not appetizing. At. All. And then they roast up the rest of the lamb for dinner. I think this is how Bo Peep lost her sheep – to a Greek Easter. So sad!

 

  1. Moving on down under, the Easter Bunny seems to have no place in Australia, since rabbits are known as pests and as a danger to wildlife. Because of this, Aussies have decided to have their Easter mascot be…a bilby. The bilby is an endangered, rabbit-like marsupial with long ears and a doglike tail, which presumably lives in the outback. This new mascot is so well-known that it now has a chocolate form to replace the evil candy bunnies swarming Australian stores.

Special thanks to Mental Floss, Skyscanner, and the Huffington Post, for helping to provide information for this list.

Questions? Comments? Let us know what you think at thehowl@etiwanda.org.

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Top 10 Crazy Easter Traditions From Around The World